Coaching conversations

The current distributed context for anyone managing people, and running teams, is a challenging one — bringing with it an emphasis and expectation for continually enhancing the ways we communicate, and bring the best out in others.

The current distributed context for anyone managing people, and running teams, is a challenging one — bringing with it an emphasis and expectation for continually enhancing the ways we communicate, and bring the best out in others. Developing, and putting into practice, 'a coaching mindset' will be critical when it comes to helping our people and teams to perform and stay resilient.

And so, in the coming weeks, we're inviting groups of people-managers within our community to join some short, virtual and purposeful sessions — led and facilitated by experienced coaches, and in which we'll combine learning, doing and coaching each other through some current challenges.

In these 90-minute, social sessions, drawing on the perspectives in the group, we'll:

• Learn how the principles of coaching can make our day-to-day relationships a whole lot more satisfying.
• Explore immediate ways a coaching-led approach will enhance the performance and wellbeing of those around us.
• Practice and apply proven principles together, in relation to our individual and collective challenges.

So it's part training session, and part peer coaching group. Learning by doing, among a supportive community of peers.

If you manage people, have some existing coaching experience that you'd like to refresh — or are new to the idea of coaching and curious to pick up some new skills — drop us an email and we'll share some dates, and add you to a coming curated group.

In the short films below, you can hear co-founder of coaching collective Cove, Liz Whitney and coach and author Hilary Gallo, sharing their belief in the power of coaching, what the discipline means to them and the impact they've seen it make on people, teams and cultures.

"Whether you think you can, or you think you cannot, you're right."

Henry Ford
Liz Whitney on building a coaching culture
Henry Ford was right