Talking about burnout — a useful reflection tool

This simple reflective tool support our live sessions and resources around the topic of burnout. It’s intended to provoke self-awareness around burnout, encouraging conversation and exploration around the topic.
Burnout Reflections

Note: This reflection tool uses an informal, intuitive and non scientific-approach. If you’re interested in a more rigorous and evidence-oriented diagnostic, you could find the Maslach Burnout Inventory a useful tool too.

Good to know

Led by coach and business psychologist Sarah Banks, coming conversational sessions in our live programme will create a safe space for managers discuss how burnout might be evident in their teams, and explore practical solutions — while managing their own mindsets and energy too.

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Developed by the team at LifeLabs learning, and drawing from Daniel Pink's thinking in his book Drive — the CAMPS model enables us to quickly sense-check how engaged (or disengaged) people in our team are feeling. Great for leaders and managers, and great for self-awareness raising too. More on that here.

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Gallup's deep dive into the causes and cures of burnout reveals actionable insights into the links between strengths, motivation and wellbeing.

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Building on the ideas in her book The Fearless Organisation, Amy Edmondson explores how hybrid working arrangements present 'a parallel increase in managerial complexity', for Harvard Business Review.

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Burnout is everyone's problem. In this episode of Adam Grant's WorkLife podcast, he digs into the concept of burnout; "the sense of exhaustion that doesn't go away with a good night's rest or an annual vacation." Listen in here. Meaning, it seems, might be the antidote (which links neatly into the thinking polar explorer Ben Saunders has shared in his live YCN sessions about the power of visualising small wins.)

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And interesting framing from Adam Grant here too, this time in the New York Times: "It wasn’t burnout — we still had energy. It wasn’t depression — we didn’t feel hopeless. We just felt somewhat joyless and aimless. It turns out there’s a name for that: languishing."

More Resources